Virtual MTM Tour

Western Related Items

Almost everyone remembers the Marx Fort Apache, the giant fort that would snap together with little blockhouses over the corner and a gate in front. What about some of the TV related western toys, such as the Gunsmoke, Wagon Train, Zorro, Roy Rogers, and the Lone Ranger Playsets. The Official Marx Toy Museum takes you into the playset with a life-size western town with jail side...straight out of the western town playsets. Guaranteed to make you feel like a cowboy when you swing open those saloon doors!


Howdy Partner!  The Marx Museum's Life-Size Western Town will introduce you to a world of Marx Western toys, including western playsets, rifles, artwork, store displays, and much more!!!

Throughout the 50's and 60's, Marx produced thousands of Marx western related items including hundreds of western related playsets. While many of the items were "unbranded", Marx produced many toys which required special licensing from TV shows and movies.
In 1951, Marx introduced the first Fort Apache Stockade. For the next 20 years, Marx would produced a variety of western "fort" playsets including Fort Apache Stockades, Rin Tin Tin Fort Apaches, Fort Dearborn, Alamo, and more. And if your western playset didn't have a fort, then it would most certainly have a metal street front, as found in the Dodge City Western Town, Gunsmoke, and Roy Rogers Western Town.
As new TV shows would become popular and movies would be released, Marx would quickly acquire the licensing to produced a similar set. In 1952, Marx released his first "branded" western sets, the Roy Rogers Ranch and the Roy Rogers Mineral City. This led to more than a dozen Roy Rogers branded playsets in the 1950's. Marx continued to focus on "branded" playsets with the release of Wyatt Earp (1959), Johnny Ringo (1959), Rifleman (1959), Gunsmoke (1960), Wagon Train (1958-1961), and more...
In the early 50's figures were produced from a vinyl-like plastic which was much more rubbery and flexible. The Marx figures were primarily produced in 60 mm scale, although some figures were produced in a much smaller 45 mm scale. The photo to the left illustrates western playset with 60 mm scale figures, often referred to as "chubby." In 1958-59, Marx began to produced figures in a slightly smaller 54 mm scale. In addition, the plastics allowed for finer details and more precise designs. This allowed allowed for the production of some incredibly detailed figures.


Although the "branded" western playsets became less popular in the 1960's, the western themed playsets continued through dozens of variations of the Marx Fort Apaches playset, including the fondly remember Fort Apache Carry-All in the tin briefcase-like box.
In addition to playsets, Marx created a variety of western related items from cap guns and rifles to miniature guns and puzzles.
In the 1960's, Marx produced precision miniatures of historic weapons called the "Famous Firearms" These firearms could be produced as a complete set as shown to the right, as individual pieces sold rubber-banded to cards, or blister packed with a special plastic firearms box for storage. A slightly larger series known as the Golden Guns were also produced and sold blistered on cards.
Throughout this time, Marx produced a number of realistic rifles in both appearance and sound. A toy gun could transform any child into their favorite cowboy character for an afternoon of fun!!! Over 15 Western Playsets On Full Dioramic Display! Original Artwork! Guns of All Sizes! And More!
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